Acupuncture for Weight Loss

Many people ask if acupuncture is good for weight loss and obesity. Weight loss with acupuncture is such a hot topic that Dr. Oz reviewed it on his blog. Acupuncture is not a quick fix for such a complex problem as controlling your weight. But research shows that  adding acupuncture treatment to your weight loss regimen can help. Losing weight involves multiple factors. Dr Oz says it requires a ‘multi pronged approach’.  Read more

Weight Loss With Acupuncture

Weight loss is more successful with acupuncture. Obesity is rampant in our country and seems to be on the rise. Acupuncture for weight loss is proven successful in research studies.

Acupuncture Weight Loss Research

Research on acupuncture and weight loss show positive benefits for people with obesity. Most studies focus on auricular acupuncture tiny needles or magnets placed at key spots on the ear. Why would an acupuncturist treat the ear? The ear represents a small version of the human body – a microcosm of the larger macrocosm of the body. Many acupuncturists do not perform acupuncture weight loss treatment on the ear, however, so don’t be confused if your acupuncturist chooses body points exclusively.

Acupuncture Points for Successful Weight Loss

Acupuncture points on the body are known to affect brain chemistry and regulate hunger signals. Some of the major points for treating weight gain are located on the arms and legs near your knees and elbows, as well as near your ankles and wrists. One of the main points for weight loss is called “Stomach 36” or Leg Three Miles (Zusanli in Chinese). Stomach 36 is located on the muscle near your shin just below the knee about one hand’s width below the kneecap.

Legend has it that the “Leg Three Miles” point helped soldiers walk ‘three more miles’ when they would become fatigued on long marches. Stomach 36 known to increase energy production because it boosts metabolism by regulating stomach function. Chinese medicine recognizes that weight gain is caused by blockage in the acupuncture meridians, or channels that course through your abdomen and body. Certain foods block the acupuncture meridians because they affect the underlying organ system that regulates the meridian. Foods such as dairy, wheat, and sugar affect an organ system responsible for extracting energy from food. When the extraction process is disrupted, metabolism slows resulting in unwanted weight gain.

Chinese Medicine & Nutrition

Acupuncture doesn’t work alone – diet is important. Choosing lighter foods such as an abundance of cooked vegetables (not raw), rice, and small quantities or animal or vegetable protein helps keep the meridians flowing because these foods nourish the underlying organ system responsible for regulating the Stomach meridian. Bottom line? Acupuncture combined with proper food choices is a winning combination for weight loss.

Nutritional Counseling & Digestion Treatment

For more information on acupuncture for weight loss, digestive problems, and success stories, read our Acupuncture for Digestion page

For more information on Chinese medicine diet recommendations check out our Nutritional Counseling page for printable articles on how to make the Asian medicine diet a part of your healthy lifestyle for 2014!

S.A.D. Acupuncture for Seasonal Affective Disorder

Feeling S.A.D.? Seasonal Affective Disorder or S.A.D. is a condition that describes feeling depressed in the fall and winter when the weather gets colder and the days get shorter. Acupuncture treatment is very effective for people who get S.A.D. But how does it work? First we must understand how acupuncturists view S.A.D.

Is S.A.D. a Disorder?

Is S.A.D. a disorder? It really depends on the severity of your symptoms. S.A.D. occurs during the change of seasons so it is called ‘seasonal’. Acupuncturists know that moods fluctuate with the seasons. Chinese medicine recognizes that our bodies are a microcosm of the natural world and that our bodies are composed of the same elements that occur in nature. As a smaller version of nature, we are intimately connected to changes that occur during seasonal cycles. Shouldn’t our moods be expected to shift accordingly?

In the fall, acupuncturists know that our energy is beginning to contract and pull inward – similar to what is happening outside our front doors as the leaves fall and trees begin to go dormant.  With the waning of daylight hours and the cessation of plant growth, our ancestors would have gathered inside to hunker down for the season.

There is a natural desire to turn inward as the fall becomes winter. As we enter the dark cold winter months, it is normal to want to conserve energy as we seek to renew ourselves for the next cycle of expansion that begins with the first buds of spring.

Since contraction of energy in the fall and winter feels like the direct opposite of the outward expansive energy of spring and summer, we may mistake our feelings for depression. Our cultural aversion to anything that is not outright happiness doesn’t help us accept the inward, reflective cycle of the approaching winter season.

Acupuncture Treats S.A.D.

Seasonal moods are a natural part of our human design – it is normal for them to change as seasons turn.  Acupuncturists know that the body is thrown off balance by any sort of ‘change’ – including the change of seasons. Adapting to change is a sign of good health and balance. But when you are unable to adapt to the change of season and your mood begins to affect your daily function it could be S.A.D.

The good news is – acupuncture can help with seasonal depression (or any type of depression for that matter). Acupuncture helps your body adapt to the change in season so you can ‘go with the flow’. Regular acupuncture treatments help people who are prone to S.A.D. adapt to the seasons more readily. People who get regular acupuncture report an overall balance in their emotional life with less severe ‘ups and downs’.

For more information on Acupuncture and Depression please visit our We Treat Depression page.

For a more complete look at Acupuncture and Seasonal Affective Disorder (S.A.D.) see the blog:

http://acutakehealth.com/seasonal-affective-not-a-disorder

Acupuncture and Restless Leg Syndrome

In 2002 Bob Flaws reported the results of a study treating restless leg syndrome with acupuncture. “Twelve of the 18 cases in this study were judged cured. This meant that bilateral pain and strange, uncomfortable sensations disappeared. Another six cases were judged to have gotten a marked effect, meaning that their lower limb pain or uncomfortable sensations, were decreased. Therefore, the total amelioration rate was 100% using this protocol.”

In 2001 Wang Jian-bo published an article titled, “The Treatment of 18 Cases of Restless Leg Syndrome with Acupuncture,” in the Zhe Jiang Zhong Yi Za Zhi (Zhejiang Journal of Chinese Medicine), #10, 2001, p. 457.

An abstract of that article appears below.

Cohort description:
Among the 18 patients in this study, there were six males and 12 females aged 54-72 years, with an average age of 63 years. All suffered from RLS. The disease course had lasted from as short as three days to as long as 16 months. In 10 cases, this was the initial diagnosis. The other eight cases had been previously diagnosed and treated with Western medicine but without effect.

Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) & Acupuncture Vol II

All these needles were retained for 20 minutes and one treatment was given per day, with 14 days equaling one course of treatment. Patients were reassessed after 1-3 such courses of treatment and, during the time of this treatment, Western medications for this disorder were suspended.

Treatment outcomes:
Twelve of the 18 cases in this study were judged cured. This meant that bilateral pain and strange, uncomfortable sensations disappeared. Another six cases were judged to have gotten a marked effect, meaning that their lower limb pain or uncomfortable sensations, were decreased. Therefore, the total amelioration rate was 100% using this protocol.

http://bluepoppy.com/cfwebstore/index.cfm/feature/526/research-report-294-restless-leg-syndrome–acupuncture-vol-ii.cfm

Alternative Digestion Treatment for IBS, Reflux and More!

Looking for natural treatment for digestion? Digestive problems such as acid reflux, indigestion, upset stomach, belching, bloating, and occasional diarrhea are considered by most people to be ‘normal’ because so many people experience these symptoms – sometimes on a daily basis! But difficulty processing your food is far from normal and has long term consequences to your health.

When you aren’t properly digesting your food, vital nutrients are passing through the digestive tract, largely unabsorbed. Taking vitamins doesn’t help because if you aren’t utilizing your nutrients due to poor digestion, the vitamins are not going to be absorbed either. Western medicine offers several pharmaceutical options that control symptoms but when you take away the drug, the symptoms return. Drugs are not a cure, they are a mask.

Acupuncture to the rescue! I have studied a wonderful technique, Dr. Tan’s Balance Method which treats every type of digestive problem. By balancing the underlying energy disturbance at the root of the dysfunction, your body returns to normal functioning and stops generating uncomfortable symptoms. Dr. Tan’s Balance method has worked wonders for many who thought they were destined to either live with their digestive problems or to mask their symptoms with pharmaceutical drugs. Read this article to learn more. Although written for acupuncturists, if you scroll down to the ‘Case Studies’ you can read how this amazing acupuncture technique helps heal the imbalances that are causing your digestive problems.

Eliminating Waste in Practice: Dr. Tan’s Eight Magic Points for All Digestive Disorders

By Lisajeanne Potyk, LAc

Most of the patients I see in my clinic suffer from a variety of digestive disorders. They do not effectively process their food. They have diarrhea, heartburn, and acid reflux disease. They’re nauseated.

And who would expect any different? In this fast-paced, high-technology culture, we’re overrun with time constraints and stressors of all kinds.

People unaware of what a good diet consists of rely on processed fast foods and meats packed with hormones and antibiotics. In the West, we’re overprescribed antibiotics and other medications; women are reeling from the side-effects of birth control pills; and we regularly take any of a myriad of anti-inflammatories for the slightest ache. It’s no wonder so many people are experiencing internal disharmony. And if all of that wasn’t enough, most people either don’t know how to, or are afraid to, release their emotions. Opting for a sense of control, they “hold.” And they get constipated.

The digestive system is a mirror to how we process our external world on every level. Are we assimilating good nutritional, emotional and spiritual nourishment, and effectively eliminating what is toxic to us? Are we letting go of negative situations and allowing ourselves to be nurtured by positive ones? Without the foundation of a healthy, properly nourished body, we can’t find the strength to feed into our emotions. If there’s a backlog of undigested emotions, any digestive symptom can manifest. Once balance in the body is established by poor nutrition and digestive functions, we gain the platform to integrate our internal and external worlds.

Traditional Chinese medicine teaches us to properly diagnose and treat our patients using staid, ancient teachings recorded thousands of years ago. People don’t change from century to century, but their circumstances do. The environment, food, medications, and stressors affecting our patients are very different today, and since the disharmonies that cause them are rampant, digestive disorders are also rampant. Diagnosis and treatment according to the TCM model, written in (and for) a different time, can therefore be complicated and confusing.

Now, imagine a group of acupuncture points that could be used to balance every kind of digestive disorder, including irritable bowel syndrome, bloating, ulcerative colitis, indigestion, and more. Imagine that the points are simple, easy to follow, and quite effective. There is no need to take the pulse, no need to consult a textbook, and no need to fumble through myriad causes. Wouldn’t that be magic? It is, thanks to Dr. Teh Fu “Richard” Tan.

Dr. Tan has dedicated his life to experimenting with combinations of points, which are used with excellent clinical results, often instantaneously. Isn’t that what we, as practitioners, want – to insert our needles, see an immediate change, and know our treatment is working? With the eight magic points, Dr. Tan offers the ability to elicit consistent, positive results.

One could consult any number of the core books written on TCM theory, but isn’t the practice of acupuncture – of healing – about how much better the patient feels after being treated? Better to learn the laws of acupuncture, become skilled at them through knowledge and discipline, and then break out into your own successful expression of them.

Dr. Tan’s Eight Magic Points

Points on one side: LI 4, SJ 5, Liv 8 (Dr. Tan’s liver point), Sp 9
Points on other side: Lu 7, P 6, St 36, GB 34p (Dr. Tan’s gallbladder point)

Liver 8 (Dr. Tan’s liver point) and GB 34p (Dr. Tan’s gallbladder point) are found in locations not traditionally known. According to Dr. Tan, needling these points is more effective. Dr. Tan’s liver point is located anterior to Sp 9 on the medial condyle of the tibia, a rich region oddly ignored throughout history. The area can sometimes be very painful to the touch, but it can be more useful than Liver 3 in treating any stagnation in the Liver channel, especially when it is attached to the emotional disorders of resentment and anger.

GB 34p is located posterior to GB 34, just under the head of the fibula, where the tendon attaches. When penetrated, the point radiates electrically down to the foot, just as P 6 goes to the finger. It works better than GB 34, and is more sensitive. If both Liver 8 and GB 34p are tender, it can indicate an emotional component to the disorder. I regularly use this treatment for digestive ailments, with excellent results.

Case Studies

A 28-year old female came to me with anxiety and constant, burning pain in her epigastric area, something she’d experienced for much of her adult life. She was highly sensitive to many foods and didn’t eat much. Most of the medical specialists she consulted gave her the same patent answer: “There’s nothing wrong with you; it’s all in your head.” She was very nervous and skeptical about acupuncture, but she was also desperate.

After the third treatment with the eight magic points, her gastric burning and discomfort began to diminish. I continued seeing her twice a week. A month later, she was eating comfortably, and was fairly calm. She’s received so much relief from the eight magic points that even a job transfer hasn’t kept her from traveling to continue occasional treatments with me.

I have found the eight magic points useful for patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation, as it is a wonderful balancing treatment. A 40-year old female with breast cancer was just finishing her course of radiation when she came to me for acupuncture. She looked literally lifeless. Mostly bedridden, she had become frail, pale and weak. Given her delicate digestion and poor appetite, she wasn’t getting the nutrients she needed to recover her strength. I kept the treatment simple, using light needling with the eight magic points. When she returned to me for our second session, a light had already turned on in her eyes. Even her family noticed the dramatic difference in her qi. Continuing treatments, she began her recovery from the adverse effects of radiation.

A pregnant woman, 28, experiencing severe vomiting and persistent nausea, came to my clinic for help. I chose to use the eight magic points, but substituted LI 3 for LI 4, which is forbidden during pregnancy. Her symptoms abated immediately. She continued with me throughout her pregnancy, and ultimately had an unusually easy delivery. She is now the mother of a healthy, contented newborn.

The eight magic points performs wonders on people experiencing emotional upset, especially women with hormonal imbalances. A 42-year old female experiencing perimenopausal symptoms came to see me for her emotional distress. Hypersensitive to everything and everyone, she felt deeply depressed and completely controlled by her emotions. She was so anxious that she couldn’t eat; she couldn’t even lie still on my table for more than 20 minutes without getting antsy. I explored my toolbox of protocols and decided intuitively to try the eight magic points. At her next treatment session, she raved about how much better she felt. I continued using the eight magic points, which became the antidote for her intense emotional imbalance.

Learning From Dr. Tan

The first six months of my apprenticeship with Dr. Tan consisted of simply observing him in his bustling clinic. I was to ask no questions. He told me, “Once you learn it in your heart, your mind will understand.” The Chinese teach by familiarity, which leads to an instinctual knowing (the tiger). Once the ground of knowing is established, the “why” is understood (the wings). The student becomes familiar by watching; masterful and responsive through doing and observing results; and, once they’ve grown their wings, creative, by developing a style uniquely theirs.

I’m just getting my wings under Dr. Tan, but my clinical practice has long taken flight with the success of these treatments and the tremendous results my patients experience. The beauty of a protocol like this is that, as with magic, we don’t have to understand why it works, because we see for ourselves that it works. Consider the eight magic points. See for yourself that it is magic

Article taken from Acupuncture Today magazine.

Acupuncture for Osteoarthritic Knee Pain

Recently, a very large study of knee pain treatment with acupuncture – involving almost 4000 participants – showed acupuncture was far more effective in relieving knee pain caused by osteoarthritis than alternative methods. This conclusion came as a result of 14 different trials in clinical settings supporting various similar studies conducted in the mid 2000’s.

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Acupuncture Effective for Sinus – Sinusitis

A new clinical study examined acupuncture for treatment of chronic sinusitis. A test group of 85 patients with sinusitis participated. Chronic rhinitis [sinusitis] is due to the Chinese medicine concept of wind-cold or wind-heat obstructing lung qi. Wind is similar to the concept of virus or bacteria in western medical terminology. Lung qi is a concept of lung function. In Chinese medicine, the lung system includes the nose. It is easily blocked by ‘wind’ or viral/bacterial invasion. Acupuncture releases pathogens trapped in the body by stimulating acupuncture points associated with the lung and nose.
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Acupuncture and Foot Pain

Studies have shown acupuncture to be effective in relieving certain types of foot pain. A study published in the journal Acupuncture in Medicine found acupuncture to be effective in relieving otherwise unresponsive chronic foot pain. Another study found that stimulation of acupuncture points on the feet could increase blood flow to the foot and lower leg. Many anecdotal reports exist of individual acupuncturists using a variety of acupuncture techniques to relieve pain associated with the ankle, heel, and ball of the foot. Read more

Robert Downey Jr. Loves Chinese Medicine!

Turns out Robert Downey Jr. uses Chinese medicine and has been for years. In the most recent edition of Acupuncture Today, Robert Downey jr. is awarded for his support of TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine). Read more

Acupuncture Causes Brain Repair After Stroke

In this recent article, research reveals that acupuncture can play a role in nerve regeneration of the brain following a stroke due to restricted blood flow to the brain.

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