Weight Loss With Acupuncture

Weight loss is more successful with acupuncture. Obesity is rampant in our country and seems to be on the rise. Acupuncture for weight loss is proven successful in research studies.

Acupuncture Weight Loss Research

Research on acupuncture and weight loss show positive benefits for people with obesity. Most studies focus on auricular acupuncture tiny needles or magnets placed at key spots on the ear. Why would an acupuncturist treat the ear? The ear represents a small version of the human body – a microcosm of the larger macrocosm of the body. Many acupuncturists do not perform acupuncture weight loss treatment on the ear, however, so don’t be confused if your acupuncturist chooses body points exclusively.

Acupuncture Points for Successful Weight Loss

Acupuncture points on the body are known to affect brain chemistry and regulate hunger signals. Some of the major points for treating weight gain are located on the arms and legs near your knees and elbows, as well as near your ankles and wrists. One of the main points for weight loss is called “Stomach 36” or Leg Three Miles (Zusanli in Chinese). Stomach 36 is located on the muscle near your shin just below the knee about one hand’s width below the kneecap.

Legend has it that the “Leg Three Miles” point helped soldiers walk ‘three more miles’ when they would become fatigued on long marches. Stomach 36 known to increase energy production because it boosts metabolism by regulating stomach function. Chinese medicine recognizes that weight gain is caused by blockage in the acupuncture meridians, or channels that course through your abdomen and body. Certain foods block the acupuncture meridians because they affect the underlying organ system that regulates the meridian. Foods such as dairy, wheat, and sugar affect an organ system responsible for extracting energy from food. When the extraction process is disrupted, metabolism slows resulting in unwanted weight gain.

Chinese Medicine & Nutrition

Acupuncture doesn’t work alone – diet is important. Choosing lighter foods such as an abundance of cooked vegetables (not raw), rice, and small quantities or animal or vegetable protein helps keep the meridians flowing because these foods nourish the underlying organ system responsible for regulating the Stomach meridian. Bottom line? Acupuncture combined with proper food choices is a winning combination for weight loss.

Nutritional Counseling & Digestion Treatment

For more information on acupuncture for weight loss, digestive problems, and success stories, read our Acupuncture for Digestion page

For more information on Chinese medicine diet recommendations check out our Nutritional Counseling page for printable articles on how to make the Asian medicine diet a part of your healthy lifestyle for 2014!

Is Acupuncture the Cure for Holiday Stress?

Ahh…Thanksgiving. A time to relax with family, enjoy a delicious meal, snuggle by the fire……really? When was the last time you felt relaxed around the holidays? Holidays have become synonymous with the word ‘stress’. Why is this?

If you think about it, modern life is unbalanced. We work too hard, play too little, and consequently experience high levels of stress and anxiety. Add a few more tasks to the ‘to do’ list like preparing a huge family meal and doing some Black Friday shopping and you’ve got the perfect recipe for stress hormones which flood the brain leading to ‘fight or flight’ response.

Acupuncture treats chronic stress by moving stuck energy or stagnant ‘qi’. (Qi is the life force that flows through your body – it literally is the force that keeps you alive!). Qi gets stuck when we are frustrated.Too much ‘to do list’ and not enough time creates a condition acupuncturists call ‘qi stagnation’. Most people describe qi stagnation as feeling ‘pent up’ or frustrated. Acupuncturists use hair thin acupuncture needles to move your body’s qi which helps you relax. But how does it work?

Acupuncture Blocks Stress Hormones

Scientists have discovered that acupuncture actually affects the brain chemistry by blocking stress hormones. In fact, acupuncture research published in the Journal of Endocrinology in 2013 demonstrated a reduction in ‘fight or flight’ hormones involved in stress response.

To read more on the acupuncture and stress reduction study: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130314085528.htm

To read more about acupuncture, stress, and anxiety relief:

http://innerlight-wellness.net/we-treat/anxiety-stress

May your holidays be happy and stress free. Well, at least less stress-full!

S.A.D. Acupuncture for Seasonal Affective Disorder

Feeling S.A.D.? Seasonal Affective Disorder or S.A.D. is a condition that describes feeling depressed in the fall and winter when the weather gets colder and the days get shorter. Acupuncture treatment is very effective for people who get S.A.D. But how does it work? First we must understand how acupuncturists view S.A.D.

Is S.A.D. a Disorder?

Is S.A.D. a disorder? It really depends on the severity of your symptoms. S.A.D. occurs during the change of seasons so it is called ‘seasonal’. Acupuncturists know that moods fluctuate with the seasons. Chinese medicine recognizes that our bodies are a microcosm of the natural world and that our bodies are composed of the same elements that occur in nature. As a smaller version of nature, we are intimately connected to changes that occur during seasonal cycles. Shouldn’t our moods be expected to shift accordingly?

In the fall, acupuncturists know that our energy is beginning to contract and pull inward – similar to what is happening outside our front doors as the leaves fall and trees begin to go dormant.  With the waning of daylight hours and the cessation of plant growth, our ancestors would have gathered inside to hunker down for the season.

There is a natural desire to turn inward as the fall becomes winter. As we enter the dark cold winter months, it is normal to want to conserve energy as we seek to renew ourselves for the next cycle of expansion that begins with the first buds of spring.

Since contraction of energy in the fall and winter feels like the direct opposite of the outward expansive energy of spring and summer, we may mistake our feelings for depression. Our cultural aversion to anything that is not outright happiness doesn’t help us accept the inward, reflective cycle of the approaching winter season.

Acupuncture Treats S.A.D.

Seasonal moods are a natural part of our human design – it is normal for them to change as seasons turn.  Acupuncturists know that the body is thrown off balance by any sort of ‘change’ – including the change of seasons. Adapting to change is a sign of good health and balance. But when you are unable to adapt to the change of season and your mood begins to affect your daily function it could be S.A.D.

The good news is – acupuncture can help with seasonal depression (or any type of depression for that matter). Acupuncture helps your body adapt to the change in season so you can ‘go with the flow’. Regular acupuncture treatments help people who are prone to S.A.D. adapt to the seasons more readily. People who get regular acupuncture report an overall balance in their emotional life with less severe ‘ups and downs’.

For more information on Acupuncture and Depression please visit our We Treat Depression page.

For a more complete look at Acupuncture and Seasonal Affective Disorder (S.A.D.) see the blog:

http://acutakehealth.com/seasonal-affective-not-a-disorder

Acupuncture Reduces Hot Flashes in Menopause

Acupuncture for hot flashes? Don’t sweat it! Research shows acupuncture reduces hot flashes. Women in menopause may needlessly suffer through hot flashes and other uncomfortable symptoms such as vaginal dryness, irritability, and weight gain.  I treat menopausal symptoms regularly at my Downingtown acupuncture office with great success! Read more

Broth is Beautiful

‘Good broth will resurrect the dead’. Sally Fallon wrote a wonderful article on this old fashioned favorite – bone broth. Read about the miraculous healing effects of this traditional food from curing the common cold to helping with thyroid issues.
Read more

Acupuncture Stops Menstrual Pain

In this study, researchers found that menstrual pain was significantly relieved with acupuncture, most specifically a point on the inside of the lower leg called SP6. In TCM style acupuncture this point is well known for dealing with all issues of menstruation. Dr. Tan style acupuncture recognizes SP6 as an image for the lower abdomen. ‘Imaging’ body parts to acupuncture points is similar to how reflexology points of the foot represent various parts of the body. Using the ‘imaging’ concept to treat pain is unique to Dr. Tan/Master Tung style acupuncture, resulting in quicker, more effective pain relief.

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Everyone Gets Acupuncture and so Should You!

Here is a fun music video to celebrate Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine Day (AOM Day) on October 24th. You’ll be amazed to hear how many celebrities and well-known people use Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine for everything from colds and flus to healthier pregnancies to better athletic performance.

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Acupuncture for Fertility – Watch WebMD Video

This short video at WebMD follows the case of Justine Ickes, a 40 year old woman who is trying to conceive. Justine was told that she had less than a 5% chance of conceiving naturally. Before Justine considered in vitro fertilization or adoption, she tried acupuncture. Acupuncture helped Justine successfully conceive her first child!

A growing collection of evidence – in both client feedback and professional studies – is showing that the ancient practice of acupuncture is an effective therapy to improve fertility, conception, and pregnancy. Recent studies have shown that acupuncture increases blood flow to the uterus, normalizes ovulation, and reduces stress hormones – all factors that improve fertility. Read more

Acupuncture for Menopause – Watch WebMD Video

WebMD presents this short video on the effectiveness of acupuncture for menopause. When Mary Alice Stuart began experiencing the hot flashes and uncomfortable symptoms of menopause, she looked for an effective alternative to hormone replacement therapy. Mary Alice wanted a natural therapy for the hot flashes and anxiety that accompany menopause stating “Hormone replacement therapy is kinda scary. For me I just don’t think it’s a healthy choice.” So Mary Alice tried acupuncture.

After her acupuncture treatments, Mary Alice noticed better moods, less anxiety, reduced hot flashes. She now receives acupuncture only once a month and takes Chinese herbs to keep her menopause symptoms under control. Mary Alice’s results are common experiences for others using acupuncture and herbs to reduce menopause symptoms.

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Osteoporosis Acupuncture Research

This short article presents a summary of an acupuncture study conducted on bone mineral density in post menopausal women who were diagnosed with osteoporosis. In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), bone loss is considered a Kidney energy disturbance. By regulating this energy, it was shown that women gained a statistically significant amount of bone density compared with a control group. Read more